knowledge at its pinnacle

Some people’s advice will only add vice to your life

Slumdog Millionaire songs download

millionaire

Top place in the movie industry’s Golden Globes awards has gone to the Indian-based drama “Slumdog Millionare.” At the ceremony in Los Angeles it swept four categories, including best director for Danny Boyle. “Slumdog” features a young Indian man in Mumbai who’s looking for love and competing for money on a television game show. Kate Winslet won two awards for best dramatic actress for her role as a frustrated housewife in “Revolutionary Road” and a German woman in “The Reader.” The Globes are a precursor to Hollywood’s Oscar awards.

SONGS>>

January 12, 2009 Posted by | music | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

World Bank names blacklisted Indian IT firms

The World Bank on Sunday said it plans to publish in the future the names of all companies it bans from doing work with the poverty-fighting institution, and immediately listed three Indian companies.

The Bank said the move aligns its disclosure practices for companies involved in wrongdoing that work on development projects financed by the World Bank and those that provide goods and services directly to the institution.

“This change was made in the interest of fairness and transparency,” the Washington-based lender said in a statement.

Until now, the World Bank has only published the names of debarred companies involved in Bank-financed projects, but has not listed blacklisted firms that receive direct contracts from the institution under its corporate procurement program.

“There are currently three companies that have been debarred along with their affiliates under the Bank Group’s corporate procurement program,” the Bank said.

It said it debarred Satyam Computer Services, India’s fourth-largest software company, for eight years in September 2008, and Wipro Technologies, India’s No. 3 software company, for four years in June 2007 both for “improper benefits to bank staff”.

In addition, it said it had also barred India’s Megasoft Consultants for four years in December 2007 for “participating in a joint venture with Bank staff while conducting business with the Bank”.

All three companies were involved in different contracts and their debarments are not related.

The World Bank has long been under pressure to step up its fight again fraud and corruption within the institution and in projects it finances in developing countries.

Satyam’s chairman and founder Ramalinga Raju resigned last week after revealing years of accounting fraud in India’s biggest corporate fraud. Raju admitted last week that about $1 billion, or 94 percent of the cash on the company’s books was fictitious.

The World Bank acknowledged only in December it had debarred Satyam following press reports that the company had been blacklisted three months earlier for “improper benefits” given to Bank officials.

In Mumbai, Wipro Ltd said in a statement its revenues from the World Bank were insignificant and the decision by the Bank to bar it would not affect business and earnings.

Shares in Wipro fell more than 12 percent after the World Bank said it had barred the company from its direct contracts.

January 12, 2009 Posted by | news | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Slumdog Millionaire Movie download

Fans of director Danny Boyle’s work will find much to appreciate in his latest film, Slumdog Millionaire, a sweeping, hopeful story about a boy in the slums of India who becomes an instant celebrity after he wins millions on India’s version of Who Wants to be a Millionaire?. Adapted by Simon Beaufoy (The Full Monty, Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day) off the novel Q &A by Vikas Swarup, the tale is framed within an interesting narrative structure that revolves around the young man, Jamal, being interrogated for fraud by the police, who cannot believe that a “slumdog” orphan could possibly have known the answers to the questions on the show.

Boyle uses this conceit to take us back and forth from the police station, where Jamal (Dev Patel) is tortured to get him to confess how he cheated, to his appearance on the show, to the events throughout his youth that led to him knowing the answers to the game show questions. How did a boy growing up in the slums amid piles of garbage and filth know which US president is on the one hundred dollar bill, or who invented the revolver? Boyle takes us back through Jamal’s life story to show us the mean-streets education that led to him knowing the answers, while managing to avoid making the set-up feel contrived.
The scenes that take place during the game show are a masterwork of interplay and intellect, as Jamal duels verbally with wealthy, narcissistic host Prem Kumar (veteran Bollywood actor Anil Kapoor), who’s sort of a Hindi version of Regis Philbin. There’s a certain level of class struggle going on within the framework of the game show, pitting the wealthy, arrogant host against the soft-spoken, affable kid from the slums. Kumar, fearing that the eminently likable young man might detract from his own popularity with the audience, taunts Jamal for being a poor chaiwalla (tea bearer) and subtly — and not so subtly — tries to get Jamal to cash in and end his winning streak. What Kumar doesn’t get is that Jamal’s not really in it for the money at all.

A screenwriter friend I talked to after last night’s sneak screening called Slumdog “Dickensonian” in style, and that’s a fairly apt comparison. While Boyle immerses the viewer in the poverty and tragedy of life as an orphan in the slums of Mumbai, he deftly avoids delving into the murky realm of “poverty porn,” which treats the lives of those caught in such circumstances gratuitously. This is a character-intensive story, with the narrative lens focused firmly on Jamal, who, in spite of growing up amidst filth, abuse and the threat of starvation, emerges with his spirit, honesty and courage intact.

The heart of the film, though, is the thread of love and friendship between Jamal and another young orphan, Latika, who’s befriended by Jamal and gruffly tolerated by his older brother. The trio call themselves “The Three Musketeers” — Jamal and his brother having been enraptured by the classic tale when they attended school before their mother died. Fate, life, and adults preying on the vulnerable youth of Mumbai’s slums conspire to keep Jamal and Latika apart, but Jamal never sways from his belief that he and Latika are destined to be together.

This love story, interwoven throughout the film, lends a classical, metaphorical level to the film that adds depth to its mainstream-audience friendly, accessible surface. Orphaned children in places like Mumbai are easy prey for adults who force or coerce them into servitude as beggars, prostitutes, and criminals. Jamal’s older brother succumbs to the lure of crime as a path out of poverty; Jamal, on the other hand, does what he has to in order to survive — when you’re five years old, homeless and starving while the adults around you kick you around like a dog for merely trying to scrounge enough to keep from dying, the morality of theft and ownership doesn’t really amount to much — but he never loses his sense of fairness, justice and compassion.

Jamal’s pursuit of Latika is single-minded; She is the only thing in his hard-knock life that he’s ever cared about other than his mother and brother. Even when Latika gives up and resigns herself to the life of abuse that it seems fate has mapped out for her, Jamal is her white knight, relentlessly fighting to free her from the prison in which beauty and destitution have trapped her.

Patel, with his wide-eyed openness and mournful brown eyes, utterly charms as Jamal — I want to see much more from this young actor in the future — and all the cast, including the kids who play Jamal, Latika and his brother in their childhood, bring life and energy to their roles. Sweeping cinematography by Anthony Dod Mantle brings the slums of Mumbai to life, finding the beauty and humanity amidst crushing impoverishment that most of us who will see the film could never imagine surviving, much less thriving in.

There’s sadness and tragedy within Slumdog Millionaire — starvation, genocide, child prostitution and overwhelming oppression — but there’s humor, humanity and dignity as well. Boyle, stepping outside the UK to focus his lens on India, seems to have freed himself here to bring his brilliance as a director to its fullest fruition. Slumdog Millionaire is Boyle’s best film to date, which is saying quite a lot; He’s made a joyous, fun, and wonderfully accessible.

movie download dvd rip

January 12, 2009 Posted by | cinema | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A.R.Rahmaan nominated for oscar

rahman-2004

A.R. Rahman’s Hindi song from ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ is a now a hot favourite at the Oscars. What is not so well known is that the song, ‘Aaja aaja shamiane ke taley’, was originally written for another movie.

Song writer Gulzar had written the song for Subhash Ghai’s latest release ‘Yuvvraaj’.

“I wrote a song ‘Aaja aaja shmiane ke taley/Zari wale neele aasman ke taley’ for Subhash Ghai’s ‘Yuvvraaj’. But then for some reason Subhash felt he didn’t need that song in the film,” Gulzar said.

“So Rahman suggested that we use the track in ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ because it fits perfectly. We asked Subhash and he readily agreed. I must say it was very generous of him.”

The number has now entered the Best Song category at the Academy Awards. It also fetched the Los Angeles Critics Choice Award for best score and has been nominated for the New York Critics Choice Award.

Brushing off the praise from Gulzar for allowing the song to be in another film, Ghai said: “Nothing generous about it. Give and take is an integral part of any creative field.

“Look at M.F. Husain Saab’s generosity. He called me up all the way from Dubai to say he loved ‘Yuvvraaj’. After the battering that it got his words came as balm to my soul, specially when Husain Saab said he saw the film twice and liked it even better the second time.

“I happily gave the ‘Aaja aaja…’ song to Rahman when he said it was needed for Danny Boyle’s film. I felt the song was slightly too soft and subtle for the aggressive character (Zayed Khan in ‘Yuvvraaj’). I’m glad they could use it.”

Any regrets, now that the song is going places?

“None at all. Every film and every song has its own destiny. That song was meant to be in ‘Slumdog Millionaire’. I’m just happy that a Hindi song is being noticed, heard and hummed in the US by non-NRI audiences,” Ghai said

January 12, 2009 Posted by | music | , , , , , | Leave a comment